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How to Have a 48 Hour Day

Presented by Don Aslett
Reported by Sharon Young Dixon, MT USA
From: LEAVEN, Vol. 35 No. 6, December 1999-January 2000, p. 132

(The following is a report on a 1999 LLLI Conference session.)

Ever wished you could have more hours in your day? Don Aslett, in his fast-paced, entertaining presentation shared his philosophy and insights into the wise use of time. Mr. Aslett's career began when he spent six years cleaning as a college student, and he has been in the cleaning business since 1963. He and his wife have six children, born in a period of seven years. He has written thirty books, one of which, Is There Life After Housework,? has sold a million copies. His seminars now draw 40% men.

Mr. Aslett's philosophy starts with the premise that "you don't manage time---you use time and then it's gone." He stated that women out-manage men two to one. His presentation centered around two lists: the "Toss Outs," activities and attitudes we need to eliminate or avoid in our lives, and the “Do Mores," healthy habits to increase personal productivity.

First the "Toss Outs”

  1. The word "try." Eliminate the word "try" from your vocabulary - it's non-committal. Either do it or don't do it!
  2. TV. The average American watches six hours of television per day. Mr. Aslett recommends watching the new channel: OFF!
  3. Spectatoring: reading the news versus making the news.
  4. Grudge carrying. Carrying a grudge takes 30% of your emotional time and space. Are you carrying a grudge? Let it go! Clear your mind and heart. Your efficiency will improve .
  5. Over playment. Play is a lot of work.
  6. Stimulants/drugs-in all their forms.
  7. Analyzing/projecting. Establish priorities and concentrate on them.
  8. Glamour/image building. Work from the inside out. The average American spends five years of his life in the bathroom!
  9. Waiting. Another five years of our lives goes to waiting.
  10. Gadgets. Be careful with gadgets: they can consume your time.

Now the "Do Mores”

  1. Volunteer-say Yes! By being available, you'll learn.
  2. Dejunk yourself. The average person handles over 300 sheets of paper per day. How you clean is how you live.
  3. Move fast! Hustle while you wait!
  4. Make your path public. Tell people what you're doing. Share your plans and goals. It will give you added motivation to follow through on your commitment.
  5. Run with winners. Ask someone to show you how to do what they do well.
  6. Use time fragments. You have 100 free ones daily. Take a project with you.
  7. Heap on the health. Be vibrant all 24 hours. Attention to proper diet and regular exercise pays big dividends.
  8. Carry a note pad. Keep those fine thoughts--write them down!
  9. More time on job.
  10. Be early for everything. Not just on time-early! Being late conveys a message: "I'm out of control." Being early sends the opposite message: "I'm in control."

Mr. Aslett challenged his listeners to discard the traditional life profile which includes twenty years spent growing up, thirty years working and raising a family, and twenty years in retirement, for one that involves growing spiritually, emotionally, and intellectually throughout life. By eliminating the "Toss Outs" and increasing the "Do Mores," you too can have a 48-hour day!

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